2
$\begingroup$

A recent question regarding bio-printing has been put on hold and I'd like to discuss the validity of the question here in the 3D Printing community.

I personally feel that the question fits within the scope of the community as it specifically requests details on the process of 3D printing.

Valid Questions:

Also can someone explain how human cells can be printed?

Would this involve some kind of cell-plastic filament?

Borderline Question:

How would the cells survive, etc. Where would you get these cells from and how would you be able to go from using a 3D printer to layer these cells together to then forming an organ out of that?

I don't see how this can be much different than:

Also can someone explain how {stainless steel} can be printed?

Would this involve some kind of {granular steel}?

For the borderline question:

How would the {stainless steel bond}, etc. [How] would you get these {granules of stainless steel} from and how would you be able to go from using a 3D printer to layer these {granules} together to then forming {a solid part}?

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

It seems like a great subject to incorporate, since bioprinting is 1) pretty neat and 2) an important application for 3D printing in general... but I sort of suspect none of our active users have the necessary expertise at the moment. It's a highly specialized field. We don't want the question to sit for an extended period with (at best) 1-2 mediocre answers, do we? That seems to be what happens to this sort of question at the site's current activity level.

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ While we might not have a large user base for bioprinting right now, the existence of questions like this can draw in those users through searches/advertisements. In the case of this specific question, I think a good magazine article might suffice as I assume the OP is really only looking for basic information anyways. Later, as more experienced users join, the question may be answered further. So, do you think this topic is acceptable despite our low user-count? $\endgroup$ – tbm0115 Apr 12 '16 at 18:03
  • $\begingroup$ I think it's a good topic -- based on previous discussions that this is more than just a "hobbyist FDM" site. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Carlyle Apr 12 '16 at 18:05
  • $\begingroup$ @RyanCarlyle, I agree. Bio printing is a novel field of research with high recent growth, even through it might not very doable on a hobby basis. $\endgroup$ – Tormod Haugene Apr 12 '16 at 18:08
2
$\begingroup$

I think 3D bio printing - just like any kind of 3d printing - certainly should fall within the scope of this site. One could argue that such questions are hard to answer, and most likely outside the knowledge of most users, but I still think good bio questions should be encouraged.

As for the linked question specifically, I think it is way too broad, asking not one, but perhaps five completely fine questions at the same time. Individually, I believe those questions would be answerable to the right person.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for bringing up the issue with multiple questions. I agree, the resolution for the question at hand would be to break the question into different pages. If there is a reason-code for "too many questions" then that should be chosen when closing or putting questions on hold moving forward? $\endgroup$ – tbm0115 Apr 12 '16 at 18:07
  • $\begingroup$ I agree! There certainly should be a code for that. I guess that "too broad" covers it fairly well in some cases, but answering a very broad question is hardly doable, while multiple separate questions could be - well - separated! $\endgroup$ – Tormod Haugene Apr 12 '16 at 18:13

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .